Archive for the 'media & communication' Category

The Coolest Timelapse Animation Ever

Transmitted on Jun 14 2008 to media & communication

Breathing new life into the medium of timelapse photography, this film (about 7 minutes) is a “timelapse drawing” completed in Baden and Buenos Aires by an Italian artist who goes by the name “Blu”. In it, characters undergo bizarre transformations into and out of 3D space, manipulating objects in their environment to “construct” new bodies. A must-see.


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(via The Long Now)

UK Television Media Bans Product Placement

Transmitted on Jun 14 2008 to media & communication

The British government has elected to ban product placement in their television media, cementing a decision to let the content of the program (or programme) serve as the “selling point”. The UK media minister writes that “product placement would undermine the [integrity] that British TV enjoys internationally” and that its use can “contaminate” programs. No one wants to feel like their shows are written by an ad agency. I’m sure there are mountains of evidence showing that product placement works, though I can’t imagine it having much effect (I’ll always remember an old episode of Alias where product placement was almost laughable–”There! He’s in the Ford F-150!”)…

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An Incomplete Manifesto

Transmitted on Apr 07 2008 to media & communication

Over at ArkiBlog is an intriguing collection of Canadian designer Bruce Mau’s thoughts on creativity and growth. Written in 1998, Mau calls this document the “incomplete manifesto”. Some of his ideas are particularly astute (numbers 1, 6, 18, and especially 29 and 42). What do you think?

1. Allow events to change you. You have to be willing to grow. Growth is different from something that happens to you. You produce it. You live it. The prerequisites for growth: the openness to experience events and the willingness to be changed by them.

2. Forget about good. Good is a known quantity. Good is what we all agree on. Growth is not necessarily good. Growth is an exploration of unlit recesses that may or may not yield to our research. As long as you stick to good you’ll never have real growth.

3. Process is more important than outcome. When the outcome drives the process we will only ever go to where we’ve already been. If process drives outcome we may not know where we’re going, but we will know we want to be there.

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